About the Slavic Languages Division

The Slavic Languages Division of the American Translators Association, first founded in 1990, brings together professional translators and interpreters working with English and one or more of the Slavic languages spoken in Eastern Europe and the non-Slavic languages of the former Soviet bloc. Some 1,100 Division members network through conference activities, the SlavFile newsletter, this website and other formal and informal networking tools. Approximately 150 of our members are currently certified for translation into or out of Russian, Polish, Croatian, or Ukrainian - the four Slavic Languages for which ATA certification is available.

In addition to the Slavic Languages – Belarusian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, and Ukrainian – some SLD members work with one or more of the non-Slavic languages of the former Soviet bloc, such as Armenian, Azeri, Bukhari, Georgian, Romanian (Moldovan), Tadjik, and Uzbek, and we consider professional activities involving such languages to be relevant to our division. While our members translate or interpret more than 20 different languages, it will be no surprise to anyone that Russian is by far the most common. However, we are now endeavoring to provide increased representation to all Slavic languages, as well as non-Slavic languages of the former USSR. Only in this way can we live up to our name and our mission.

While most of our members reside in the United States and Canada, some live in Russia, Ukraine, Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, Finland, England, Italy, Switzerland and Argentina. Judging from results of recent member surveys, approximately half our members are native speakers of English while half speak Russian and/or another Slavic language or language of the former Soviet bloc as a mother tongue. Also according to these results, our members have worked in translation/interpretation for periods ranging from less than 1 year to over 40 years. We attempt to meet the unique, as well as the shared professional needs of our member subgroups, and especially welcome newcomers both to our profession and to our organization.